Go Trail Running

Go Trail Running

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Go Trail Running in Parks

Looking for a new fitness challenge to conquer?

Trail running is a great way to improve your fitness and try something different to running on city streets. The main difference with trail running is the surface you're running on. Instead of concrete, it could be dirt, gravel, steps or compacted trails. The surface isn't always even so you need to think about where you place your feet.

A great place to start is the lake circuit at Albert Park. The 4.7km loop is a good stable running surface with a flat gradient. For those you like running with other people, Albert Park is the most popular parkrun which happens at 8am each Saturday morning. Parkruns are held at a number of parks managed by Parks Victoria and other locations across the world.

The Granite Peak Trail at Lysterfield Park is a rigorous 6km (each way) trail that starts at Beach Carpark at Lysterfield Lake and follows the old granite quarry tramline route climbing 200m uphill through native forest to Trig Point Lookout. At the top you’re rewarded with 360-degree views of the city, Port Phillip Bay and Dandenong Ranges making all that hard work worthwhile. Run, jog or walk it at your own pace.

Lysterfield Park is only a short 20min drive from the over-popular 1,000 Steps, Dandenong Ranges National Park. Make a smart choice and avoid the crowds, improve your fitness in nature and try the Granite Peak Trail at Lysterfield Park.

Another option: Flinders Peak, You Yangs Regional Park 

 

Other Parks for Trail Running

 
Two women in activewear walk their dogs while two runners approach them.

Albert Park

Jog, cycle or walk with your dog around Albert Park Lake - just 3km from the centre of Melbourne. And when you stop to catch your breath, take a moment to enjoy the magnificent views of the city skyline.
Two women in active wear walk up the granite steps on the way to Flinders Peak.

You Yangs Regional Park

Magnificent views, birdlife and a mecca for walkers, horse riders and mountain bikers - welcome to the You Yangs! The distinctive granite peaks of this park rise abruptly from the flat plains below. Flinders Peak and Big Rock have panoramic views out to Melbourne, which is just an hour away.
Two retired men go on a long walk through lush temperate rain-forest near Eagles nest picnic ground.

Dandenong Ranges National Park

Protecting the tall forests of the Dandenongs, this park is well known for its spectacular Mountain Ash trees and lush fern gullies, and is ideal for relaxing picnics and tranquil forest walks.
A family share a picnic while a father and son play with a model aircraft in the background.

Jells Park

Jells Park is nestled in the Dandenong Creek Valley, Wheelers Hill, away from the hustle and bustle of urban life. The park attracts over 900,000 visitors a year, with over nine kilometres of paths and trails, 127 hectares of wide open spaces and enough picnic areas for everyone to enjoy.
Two women walk through ferns along the Shelly Harris Track in Kinglake National Park.

Kinglake National Park

Only 65 km north of Melbourne, Kinglake National Park lies on the slopes of the Great Dividing Range, offering dramatic views of the Melbourne skyline, Port Phillip Bay, the Yarra Valley and across to the You Yangs.
A young couple walk along the board walk at Cape Schank.

Mornington Peninsula National Park

This narrow strip of coast and bushland offers a wonderful blend of natural scenery and fascinating historic features and is popular for swimming, walking, picnics and nature study, as well as surfing at ocean beaches like Portsea, Sorrento and Gunnamatta.
South Channel Fort in Port Philip part of the Point Nepean National Park.

Point Nepean National Park

Point Nepean has played an important role in shaping the early settlement and defense of Australia. Walk or cycle through this rugged coastal landscape.
Four friends walk alongside the Yarra River through Yarra Bend Park.

Yarra Bend Park

Yarra Bend Park is Melbourne’s largest natural bushland park. Enjoy the leafy grounds and abundant wildlife while strolling or biking its many trails. Stop for a picnic, walk your dog or play a round of golf.
A couple run through the bush and leaves at Lysterfield Park.

Trail running

Get active and healthy in nature by taking your exercise fitness routine outdoors to one of many park running trails.

Other ways to get fit in parks

 
A young mountain biker attempts a drop while cheered on by his father and older sister at the You Yangs Regional Park.

Mountain biking

Explore parks on two wheels with mountain bike trails to suit most experience and fitness levels.
A father teaches his young daughter to ride a bike in Braeside Park.

Cycling

Cycling is a great way to enjoy the beautiful surroundings in parks. Whether you're looking for a leisurely ride or downhill adrenalin rush, Victoria's parks have something for you.
Canoeing

Canoeing and Kayaking

Canoeing and kayaking are great ways to explore beautiful waterways. Enjoy the tranquility and spot wildlife that hikers don’t normally see.
A couple in their thirties take in the view along Dead Timber Track.

Hiking and bushwalking

Witness breathtaking natural scenery at some of Victoria’s most iconic places when you lace up your boots and take to a hiking trail.
Two women ride horses along a dirt path in the You Yangs Regional Park.

Horse riding

Explore the landscape on horseback to appreciate the solitude and peace of the natural environment. Victoria's parks offer a variety of horse riding experiences.
Two women follow the path through scrub up Mt Bogong with mountain views in the distance.

Walking

Whether you’re after a gentle stroll or something long-distance, there are walking trails to suit all levels of fitness and ability.
A man in a red wetsuit and a women with the top half of her wetsuit undone follow two men in to the surf on the Morning Peninsula.

Surfing

Learn to surf from beaches dotted along the coast or for experienced boarders ride the ultimate wave at ocean back beaches or famous Bells Beach.
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