Wilsons Promontory National Park to walk a few of the many coastal trails including the giant sand dunes at Big Drift or experience magnificent views to the coastal headland of Tongue Point. Walk along the expanse of pristine sands in Ninety Mile Beach Marine National Park or follow the far-eastern coastline of Croajingolong National Park, a UNESCO World Biosphere Reserve, with secluded coastal camping spots perfect for beach walks, birdwatching, boating and fishing.

Head toward the iconic Great Ocean Road to experience the natural beauty of Victoria’s rugged coastal landscape. Take in the fresh ocean breezes and stunning ocean views from towering limestone cliffs. Point Addis Marine National Park features spectacular scenery with wide sandy beaches, crumbling sandstone cliffs and rocky platforms and is home to world renowned surfing reserve, Bells Beach. Step on to the Great Ocean Walk - a one-way long-distance bushwalk extending east to west, just over 100km, between Apollo Bay and the 12 Apostles. Weave your way through coastal heathlands, wild rocky shores and windswept cliff-tops to settle down at night and camp on the beach. Travel beyond the 12 Apostles to the coastlines of Port Campbell National Park and Bay of Islands Coastal Park. Sculpted over millions of years, this special part of Victoria boasts some of the most beautiful natural areas in the world including Loch Ard Gorge and the Bay of Martyrs. Continue along to Discovery Bay Coastal Park to see high coastal cliffs, huge rolling sand dunes and freshwater lakes. Look out over the rocks to see the largest colony of Australian fur seals on the mainland.

" property="og:description"> Beaches and coasts

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Beaches and coasts

Venture out along Victoria’s dramatic coastline and explore one of the most biodiverse and unique marine ecosystems in the world. The rugged, southern coast of Australia has been isolated for millions of years from other continents due to ocean currents, resulting in unique marine life evolving in many different ways. Home to over 12,000 species of plants and animals, 90% of all marine life here is found nowhere else.

To the east of Melbourne, discover some of Victoria's most spectacular and pristine unspoilt beaches. The broad sandy open beaches of Venus Bay in Cape Liptrap Coastal Park are popular for swimming, surfing and fishing all year round. Travel to spectacular Wilsons Promontory National Park to walk a few of the many coastal trails including the giant sand dunes at Big Drift or experience magnificent views to the coastal headland of Tongue Point. Walk along the expanse of pristine sands in Ninety Mile Beach Marine National Park or follow the far-eastern coastline of Croajingolong National Park, a UNESCO World Biosphere Reserve, with secluded coastal camping spots perfect for beach walks, birdwatching, boating and fishing.

Head toward the iconic Great Ocean Road to experience the natural beauty of Victoria’s rugged coastal landscape. Take in the fresh ocean breezes and stunning ocean views from towering limestone cliffs. Point Addis Marine National Park features spectacular scenery with wide sandy beaches, crumbling sandstone cliffs and rocky platforms and is home to world renowned surfing reserve, Bells Beach. Step on to the Great Ocean Walk - a one-way long-distance bushwalk extending east to west, just over 100km, between Apollo Bay and the 12 Apostles. Weave your way through coastal heathlands, wild rocky shores and windswept cliff-tops to settle down at night and camp on the beach. Travel beyond the 12 Apostles to the coastlines of Port Campbell National Park and Bay of Islands Coastal Park. Sculpted over millions of years, this special part of Victoria boasts some of the most beautiful natural areas in the world including Loch Ard Gorge and the Bay of Martyrs. Continue along to Discovery Bay Coastal Park to see high coastal cliffs, huge rolling sand dunes and freshwater lakes. Look out over the rocks to see the largest colony of Australian fur seals on the mainland.

Things To Do

This area is well known for its wildlife. Keep an eye out for:

Mum helps her young son as he jumps off a large piece of drift wood at West Cape Beach.

Beaches

Walk white sandy beaches, swim in cool coastal waters or surf the wild waves of the Southern Ocean.
Two friends fish off the back a boat on a misty morning on Lake Eildon.

Fishing

In quiet lakes and gently flowing rivers, in the pounding surf or in the depths beneath your boat – the waters of Victoria’s parks and reserves offer some prize catches.
Two women ride horses along a dirt path in the You Yangs Regional Park.

Horse riding

Explore the landscape on horseback to appreciate the solitude and peace of the natural environment. Victoria's parks offer a variety of horse riding experiences.
A couple walk down the track and away from the Lighthouse at Cape Schank on the Mornington Peninsula.

Lighthouses

Learn about the seafaring past of Victoria's rugged and unforgiving coastline at marine and maritime exhibits and sites.
A man in a red wetsuit and a women with the top half of her wetsuit undone follow two men in to the surf on the Morning Peninsula.

Surfing

Learn to surf from beaches dotted along the coast or for experienced boarders ride the ultimate wave at ocean back beaches or famous Bells Beach.
A diver takes a photo a school of fish in the Wilsons Promontory Marine National Park.

Scuba diving

Dive to the depths of the ocean floor in marine national parks or explore shipwrecks at the bottom of the bays.

When to go

Most of Victoria's beaches are very popular throughout the summer months. If you're looking to escape the crowds, there are secluded beaches in East Gippsland.

Need to know

Beaches and coasts

Beaches and Coasts Camping

A fantastic example of beaches and coast camping is at Croajingolong National Park which follows the remote coast of far-east Victoria and is home to ancient forests, pristine inlets, giant sand dunes and abundant wildlife. Canoe, kayak or boat to explore Tamboon, Mallacoota and Wingan Inlet. Camp at Thurra River, walk the Wilderness Coast or step back in time at Point Hicks Lightstation.
Croajingolong National Park

Similar experiences

 
A young couple walk along the board walk at Cape Schank.

Mornington Peninsula National Park

This narrow strip of coast and bushland offers a wonderful blend of natural scenery and fascinating historic features and is popular for swimming, walking, picnics and nature study, as well as surfing at ocean beaches like Portsea, Sorrento and Gunnamatta.
A retired coulpe chat with a Parks Victoria Ranger at Fort Nepean.

Point Nepean National Park

Point Nepean has played an important role in shaping the early settlement and defense of Australia. Walk or cycle through this rugged coastal landscape.
A young couple paddle kayaks on a sunny afternoon across Lake Eildon.

Lake Eildon National Park

Lake Eildon National Park is in the northern foothills of Victoria's Central Highlands, 150 km north-east of Melbourne. Situated on the shores of Lake Eildon, the park protects 27,750 ha of rugged hills with open woodlands through to dense forest.
Two campers relax at their campsite after a long paddle.

Lower Glenelg National Park

The Glenelg River is the central feature of the Lower Glenelg National Park. Along the last part of its winding 400 kilometre path to the sea the river has carved a spectacular gorge up to 50 metres deep through limestone. River erosion and the action of rainwater have created a remarkable cave.
A group of five children play in the rock pools at Ricketts Point late in the afternoon.

Ricketts Point Marine Sanctuary

Crystal clear shallow waters, sandstone reefs, sea caves, and rockpools make Ricketts Point the perfect place to discover the wonderful sea creatures of Port Phillip Bay.
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