Camping in Murray Sunset National Park

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Camping in Murray Sunset National Park

There are few designated campgrounds or facilities within Murray Sunset National Park. Many of the tracks lead to perfect shady sites along the creeks, some sites have picnic tables.

There are eleven campgrounds in the park, with a range of basic facilities (see the table below). Camping is free, and no bookings are required, however campers must be well-prepared and self-sufficient. No drinking water or bins are provided. There is bookable accommodation at the Shearers Quarters.

 Campgrounds

 Picnic tables

 Toilets

 Fire pits

 Border (4WD)  x
x
 Henschke Track (4WD)  x    
 Lake Becking (2WD)  x  x  x
 Lake Crosby / Main Campground (2WD)  x  x  x
 Mopoke Hut (4WD)  x  x  x
 Mt Crozier (4WD)  x  x  x
 Mt Crozier Remote (4WD)  x    x
 Pheenys Track (4WD)  x  x  x
 Rocket Lake (4WD)  x  x  x
 Shearers’ Quarters (4WD)  x  x  x
 Sunset Tank (4WD)  x    x

Feature Campgrounds

 

Wallpolla Island
Many of the tracks lead to perfect shady sites along the river and creeks where bush camping or picnicking can be enjoyed.
Access
Wallpolla Island is about 570kms north‐west of Melbourne and 350kms east of Adelaide. Access to the island is via the Old Mail Road, an unsealed road running between Meridian Road and Lock 9 Road. Two-wheel drive vehicles can access the island in dry weather, however four-wheel drive vehicles are recommended. All tracks are dry weather only and gates will be closed during flooding.
Bookings
No booking is required. Camping is on a first in, first-served basis.
Facilities
There are no designated camping areas but bush camping is possible.

Moke Hut
Access
Access to Mopoke Hut is by four wheel drive only along Mopoke Hut Trak.
Bookings
No booking is required. Camping is on a first in, first-served basis.
Facilities
Non-flush toilets, picnic table and a fireplace is provided.
Campsites
Basic campsites only are available.

Lindsay Island

Located in the far north-west corner of the state, Lindsay Island is intersected by a number of small creeks carrying floodwaters from the Murray River into swamps, billabongs and flood plains. The Island is home to an array of plants and animals and has a rich heritage. Access to Lindsay Island is via the Old Mail Road, an unsealed road running between Meridian Road and Lock 9 Road. Two-wheel drive vehicles can access the island in dry weather, however four-wheel drive vehicles are recommended. All tracks are dry weather only and gates will be closed during flooding.

Many of the tracks lead to perfect shady sites along the creeks where bush camping or picnicking can be enjoyed. Avoid resting, picnics or camping under or close to trees. They may drop heavy branches at any time without warning.
Bookings
No booking is required. Camping is on a first in, first-served basis.
Facilities
There are no designated camping areas but bush camping is possible.
Practice minimal impact camping and observe relevant fire regulations. Beware of falling River Red Gum limbs when camping.

 

Lake Becking

The picturesque Pink Lakes are so named because of their colour during late summer. The Pink Lakes change in colour throughout the year from a deep pink to a glistening white. A red pigment, carotene, is secreted from the algae - best seen early or late in the day or when it is cloudy. The lakes evaporate over summer leaving concentrated salt crusts over black mud.

Booking
No booking is required. Camping is on a first in, first-served basis.
Facilities

Non-flush toilets, fireplaces and picnic tables are provided.
Campsites
Basic campsites only are available.
Water
No drinking water is provided – supply your own.

 

 
A Land Rover Defender attempts a river crossing in the Alpine National Park.

4WD

Enjoy a range of short and long 4WD trips in Victoria's parks. From the desert or mountains, to the rainforest or snow, 4WD tracks cater for all levels of skill and expertise.
Father and son bird watching on boardwalk

Bird watching

From bushland to wetlands and everything in between, parks provide habitat to an abundance of common and rare bird species. Go for a wander and see how many you can spot.
A couple watch the sunset at a picnic table on the edge of Lake Catani at Mount Buffalo National Park.

Sunrises and sunsets

Spectacular sunsets from the summits and to west, and picturesque sunrises in the east , top-and-tail your day the perfect way.
Stargazing in the Murray Sunset National Park.

Stargazing

Escape the city lights to remote nature locations to see the spectacular starry southern night sky.
Wildflowers

Wildflowers

Whether you’re surrounding yourself with carpets of colourful flowers, spotting rare orchids, or just enjoying the local native flowers, it’s a great way to immerse yourself in nature and help your spirits soar.
Three friends take a break from their walk to take a photo of a Kangaroo who is equally watching them.

Wildlife viewing

Get up close and personal with some of Australia's shy native wildlife or look up to spot tree-dwelling mammals and flocks of colourful birds,

How to get there

Camping in Murray Sunset National Park

Sites

Camper Trailer
Campervan
Tent
Boat
Caravan
Mobile Home

Need to know

Camping in Murray Sunset National Park

Change of Conditions

Nature being nature, sometimes conditions can change at short notice. It’s a good idea to check this page ahead of your visit for any updates.

  • Murray - Sunset National Park

    Bridge closed

    The Robertsons Track-Wallpolla Creek Bridge has been closed, as the bridge is no longer safe to use.

    Blue-green algae

    A blue-green algae bloom is currently affecting sections of the Murray River from Red Cliffs (Mildura Weirpool) through to Cullulleraine (Lock 9 Weirpool). Visitors should observe and follow directions on signage and are warned not to swim in or have any direct contact with the water, and to prevent their pets from drinking or having any contact with the water. We will continue monitoring water quality. More information about health impacts can be found here.

    Blue-green algae

    A blue-green algae bloom is currently affecting sections of the Murray River from Red Cliffs (Mildura Weirpool) through to Cullulleraine (Lock 9 Weirpool). Visitors should observe and follow directions on signage and are warned not to swim in or have any direct contact with the water, and to prevent their pets from drinking or having any contact with the water. We will continue monitoring water quality. More information about health impacts can be found here.

Similar Experiences

 
Two people camping by the water

Camping in Hattah - Kulkyne National Park

The freshwater Hattah Lakes is seasonally filled by creeks connected to the Murray, providing food and shelter for waterbirds and fish. These lakes can remain full for up to ten years without flooding, but flooding generally occurs once every two years. Camping, walking, bike riding and canoeing are popular here and in the adjoining Murray-Kulkyne Park.
The view from inside a tent, looking out to the grassy landscape and cloudy sky.

Camping in Wyperfeld National Park

Camp under the stars among Mallee sand dunes at Wonga, Snow Drift or Casuarina campgrounds.
A woman enjoys a cup of tea while sat at a picnic table infront of her tent at Bunga Arm Campsite in the Gippsland Lakes.

Camping in Gippsland Lakes Coastal Park

The campground is separated from the beach by a stretch of fenced vegetation. There is access to the beach from the Paradise Beach camping area. Use this access points to reduce damage to the sensitive coastal vegetation.
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