Dispersed camping in Alpine National Park

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Dispersed camping in Alpine National Park

The Alpine National Park offers some of the most authentic and scenic bush camping opportunities in Victoria. Camping in the park is suited to experienced hikers and campers that are self sufficient.

Dispersed camping is permitted throughout much of the park. There are some camping areas that include facilities such as pit toilets, picnic tables and fireplaces.

Within the Alpine National Park bookings and fees apply only to the Falls to Hotham Alpine Crossing.

Further information and the location of camping areas can be found in the related publications below.

When camping you should be fully self sufficient with food, water and camping equipment. Always carry a tent. Huts are for emergency use only. Firewood supplies are limited especially in the alpine and sub alpine areas, so the use of camping stoves is preferred.

Weather can deteriorate suddenly and without warning, and snow can fall at any time of year, including mid-summer. Don't hesitate to turn back if the trip becomes too difficult or the weather deteriorates. Some roads are subject to seasonal closures in winter and early spring, check closures before you go.

Things to do in the area

 
Three horseriders saddle-up a pack horse before the day's riding.

Camping with your horse in Alpine National Park and Howqua Hills

The Alpine National Park and Howqua Hills Historic Area provide a unique and stunning backdrop for multi-day horse rides.
Three friends stop for a quick drink late in the afternoon on their walk from Hotham to Falls Creek.

Falls to Hotham Alpine Crossing

One of Victoria's icon walks, the 37km Falls to Hotham Alpine Crossing (FHAC) is a 3 day/2 night walk through the Alpine National Park, linking the resort villages of Falls Creek and Mt Hotham.
The majestic Lake Tali Karng.

Tali Karng

Tali Karng is a hidden jewel nestled deep in the mountains of Gippsland, fed by snowmelt waters of the Wellington Plains. Accessible only by foot, it is known as the ‘hidden lake’.

How to get there

Dispersed camping in Alpine National Park

The Alpine National Park stretches from central Gippsland all the way to the New South Wales border. The horse yards available for booking on this page are mostly around the Mansfield and Whitfield area or the Mount Beauty and Bogong High Plains area of the Alpine National Park. Some of the horse yards are in neighbouring Howqua Hills Historic Area, which is located 30 minutes from Mansfield via Merrijig by taking the Howqua Track, a gravel road 3km past Merrijig on the Mount Buller Road.

Sites

Camper Trailer
Tent
Campervan
Mobile Home
Caravan

Need to know

Dispersed camping in Alpine National Park

Change of Conditions

Nature being nature, sometimes conditions can change at short notice. It’s a good idea to check this page ahead of your visit for any updates.

  • Notices Affecting Multiple Parks

    Extended seasonal road closures 2019

    Some roads in this park are subject to extended seasonal road closures. Seasonal road closures generally operate after the long weekend in June through to the end of October, but may be extended due to seasonal conditions. View the list of 2019 seasonal road closures for details and check the corresponding map numbers with the seasonal road closure 2019 index map for locations of the extended closures and visit the seasonal road closures page for more information.

  • Alpine National Park

    Dargo High Plains Road closure

    The Dargo High Plains Road (managed by the Alpine Shire Council) will remain closed until the end of November from the closure gate, approximately 1km south of Lanky Plain. For further information please call the Alpine Shire on 03 5755 0555, or refer to their website.

    Poor condition of Armstrong Track, Deddick Valley

    Armstrong Track is in very poor condition with several very steep, loose and severely rutted sections. The track condition deteriorates progressively the further south you travel, with the worst section of the track being the final descent towards the Deddick River near Bull Flat. The track is rated as double black diamond (very difficult in dry conditions) and should only be attempted by groups of experienced drivers in well-equipped vehicles with recovery equipment and should not be attempted in wet conditions. The track should only be driven in a southerly direction from Mt Taylor to Bull Flat and drivers should not proceed past any point where they would not be able to drive in the opposite direction.

Similar Experiences

 
Two friends explore JB Plain after spending the night camping out.

Camping in Baw Baw National Park

Dispersed bush camping is permitted on the Baw Baw Plateau. The Plateau is a fuel stove only area – no solid fuel fires are permitted and collecting firewood prohibited in the Park. The area falls within domestic water supply catchments, so care must be taken with the disposal of human waste.
The view from inside a tent, looking out to the grassy landscape and cloudy sky.

Camping in Wyperfeld National Park

Camp under the stars among Mallee sand dunes at Wonga, Snow Drift or Casuarina campgrounds.
Shearers Quarters - an historic self-contained four bedroom cottage in the middle of the Murray Sunset National Park.

Shearers Quarters

The Shearers Quarters is an historic self-contained cottage nestled in the remote heart of Murray-Sunset National Park. It is a great place to get away from it all and enjoy the serenity of the bush
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