Aboriginal heritage

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Aboriginal heritage

No other country on Earth has the ancient stories and culture evident on rock art sites and rock wells throughout parks in Victoria, Australia. The Grampians National Park is the richest site for Aboriginal rock art in Victoria. The region has the largest number of rock art sites in southern Australia and 90 per cent of Victoria’s known rock art sites, some dating back more than 20,000 years. About 140 rock art sites are recorded in the Grampians National park with five sites open to the public. Most art sites are under rock over hangs providing shelter and strategic viewing points of the surrounds.

Visit Brambuk the National Park and Cultural Centre to learn more about the Aboriginal culture and history of Grampians National Park.

Experience Aboriginal culture

 
A young couple walks up through ancient lava flows to Sundial Peak in the Central Grampians.

Grampians National Park

Rising abruptly from the surrounding Western Plains, the Grampians (Gariwerd) is a series of rugged sandstone mountain ranges and forests rich in wildlife. One of Victoria’s most popular holiday destinations, the park is a great venue for camping, climbing, scenic drives, bushwalks and nature study.
A retired coulpe chat with a Parks Victoria Ranger at Fort Nepean.

Point Nepean National Park

Point Nepean has played an important role in shaping the early settlement and defense of Australia. Walk or cycle through this rugged coastal landscape.
A young couple walk through a cave in Budj Bim National Park

Budj Bim National Park

Budj Bim is a long dormant volcano. Budj Bim is the source of the Tyrendarra lava flow which extends over 50km to the southwest. It is central to the history of the Gunditjmara people.
Mother and young daughter look at the rock formations in the Fairy Cave at Buchan Caves Reserve.

Buchan Caves Reserve

Near the township of Buchan, lies a honeycomb of caves full of spectacular limestone formations. The caves were formed by underground rivers cutting through limestone rock
Two kayakers come across a group of pelicans on the Gippsland Lakes.

Gippsland Lakes Coastal Park

The tranquil Gippsland Lakes are a system of coastal lagoons separated from the Tasman Sea by the coastal dunes of the Ninety Mile Beach. Seven rivers terminate at the lakes – the Latrobe, Avon, Nicholson, Tambo, Mitchell, Macalister and Thomson rivers.
A pelican on the water at the Lakes National Park in Gippsland.

The Lakes National Park

The Lakes National Park is a peaceful bushland retreat in the Gippsland Lakes, fringed by the waters of Lake Victoria and Lake Reeve.

Need to know

Aboriginal heritage

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Father and son bird watching on boardwalk

Bird watching

From bushland to wetlands and everything in between, parks provide habitat to an abundance of common and rare bird species. Go for a wander and see how many you can spot.
Two women follow the path through scrub up Mt Bogong with mountain views in the distance.

Walking

Whether you’re after a gentle stroll or something long-distance, there are walking trails to suit all levels of fitness and ability.
A mother, father and their two young daughts gaze out at the sea from the lookout point of the lighthouse.

Historic sites

Journey back in time and visit some of the historic buildings of post European settlement in Australia, including huts, mansions and lighthouses.
Wildflowers

Wildflowers

Whether you’re surrounding yourself with carpets of colourful flowers, spotting rare orchids, or just enjoying the local native flowers, it’s a great way to immerse yourself in nature and help your spirits soar.
Three friends take a break from their walk to take a photo of a Kangaroo who is equally watching them.

Wildlife viewing

Get up close and personal with some of Australia's shy native wildlife or look up to spot tree-dwelling mammals and flocks of colourful birds,
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